Friday, November 04, 2005

Sound Familiar?

First the bad news; Did a quick calculation, I figure there are still $300+ worth of games in my friendly, local, game store (FLGS) that I need to buy.

More bad news; That doesn't count HeroScape expansions. My FLGS doesn't carry HeroScape. I have to get them though my FLWM (friendly, local WalMart) and that's gonna be a another chunk of change.

Now more bad news; Caylus, Tempus, Indonesia, Kreta, Railroad Tycoon, Siena, PUNCT, Reef Encounter, Ys, and the Tigris and Euphrates Card Game have yet to be widely released.

The good news; There is no good news.

My conundrum; If I get a part time job to support my game habit, I won't have time to game. As a compromise I'm trying to get my wife to get a part time job.

Can I pawn a cat? And if so, do I have to prove it's my cat?

If I spend everything, can I get Choam Charity?

I've given it some thought and I've reached two conclusions. First, I need to open my own game store. Not to get games at cost, although that thought did cross my mind, rather to give me an excuse to play games and call it work. Maybe I can turn my addiction into a tax write off. At best, it would be a second full-time job for at least a couple years. At best. That would mean less time for gaming with people I want to game with.

Second, this town can't support a second game store. It can't even support one. The existing game store probably does all right with Magic and 40k miniatures and such, but comic books, anime, geeky nicknack, and baseball cards are the important part of the business. Boardgames are barely a blip on the radar screen.

Doesn't sound too promising. Maybe I could set my game store apart if I had an attached espresso bar, aaaaaand sold auto parts, aaaaaand performed discount surgery.

How about if I called it; "Coldfoot's Games, Escorts, and Napoleon Dynamite Videos"? I would have a lock on the geek market, that's a lead pipe cinch. Although I would probably have to change the name when the next Star Trek movie is released, and that would just be a hassle.

How about "Picard Games"? Now that's an idea. "Picard Games and Seven of Nine Comics". Ooooooh. That just might work.

3 comments:

Sean said...

In high school a friend of mine and I thought it might be interesting to open a store called Corn Dog on a Stick...and sell stereo components. Perhaps you could try for the completely obscure name instead. I have often thought of opening a game store, but the thought of getting up from a nice game of Traders of Genoa to sell a kid some Pokemon cards always reminds me of why it is better to just have a really expensive time consuming hobby.

DWTripp said...

Back in the late 1980's a guy I knew decided he would open a store to get his games cheap. His background was as a pet store employee and Vet Tech. So... he opened a store that sold aquarium fish and pet birds. In the rear he had a game selection that catered very specifically to his personal tastes... mainly BattleTech and a few other items like D&D.

He ran a big BattleTech tournament almost every week-end where he was the judge. He also played in them. He also won most of them.

I can't recall the name of his store... we just called it Mike's Fish, Fowl & Fantasy

Todd D. said...

$300? Read up on them, and you'll figure out one or two are dogs, or won't ever get played, or something. Plus, you've got a game or two you don't play currently, right? Work some trades, and you might only be out $150 when it's all said and done.

Prioritize, budget, and bargain. It's weird how trying to fit games into the budget improves your budgeting skills threefold. Skip your daily soda for two weeks, and before you know it... you'll really, really, really want a soda. And $300 in boardgames.

The other thing my wife and I did was split up our finances so our fun money is in cash. Each month, I get a small sum for games, beer, comics, and whatever else I want. That keeps me from buying plasma TVs on credit cards. My wife uses her fun money for CDs, books on Half.com, and cappuchinos at cafes. This keeps her from starting unnecessary and expensive home improvements.